Danny James


May you live as long as you want to, and want to as long as you live.

Benny Hill


To climb again, your fallen hopes permit.
To wonderment return, against cleverness resist.
Though furthest have you wandered you are least forgot,

please, homeward steer your aching heart
and do not for anything stop.

498: The inextinguishable

You are the inextinguishable sun. And it will rain no doubt, and for your magnificent shine that it has weakened may you weep. See your gift is not diminished but altered and evolves a rainbow.


I would quit this job in a second for a chance to take photos like this all the time. I would write my girlfriend everyday and call my family from a pay phone




Enthusiasm is common. Endurance is rare.

495: Work

Luck is not something you can mention in the presence of self-made men.

E. B. White


Laconic Coaching

“He who knows how to speak, knows also when” – Archidamidas

Ancient Greece was a fascinating culture, and a fascinating time. Even the way they communicated is fascinating. Greece was obsessed with rhetoric; the ability to debate, and to deliver elegant and persuasive speeches was highly prized in society.

The exception to this are the Spartans. The residents of the ancient city of Sparta (often called Laconians, after the region that Sparta was capital of) were known to abhor the typical longwinded Greek obsession with language.

These days, through what we know of their history, Spartans are remembered not only for their courage, frugality, and simplicity, but for their economy of speech; so much so that we call this manner of speaking ‘laconic’.

“Spartans were expected to be men of few words and stick to the point”
They felt that there was power not only in what is said, but in what is not said.

One challenge for coaches is to be ‘Spartan’ with our language; to use as few words as possible, and allow learning to be driven by the athlete’s experience with their surroundings and the task we give them.

We must get to the point – quickly; economy in language is crucial if we want to be heard. Attention spans are diminishing by the day. This makes it especially important for us to be concise; to shorten our message.

We can always add details later, if necessary.

Too often, words get in the way. We use them to mask our insecurity. In our desire to prove to the athletes how much we know, we often overwhelm them with information.

Like the Spartans, the wise coach will know what not to say – not just what to say.

493: Blink if you can hear me

The years are collecting, magic diminished and flickering.

… Do something.


Every spirit builds itself a house; and beyond its house a world; and beyond its world, a heaven. Know then, that the world exists for you. For you is the phenomenon perfect. What we are, that only can we see. All that Adam had, all that Caesar could, you have and can do. Adam called his house, heaven and earth; Caesar called his house, Rome; you perhaps call yours, a cobler’s trade; a hundred acres of ploughed land; or a scholar’s garret. Yet line for line and point for point, your dominion is as great as theirs, though without fine names. Build, therefore, your own world.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature


I am considered a misanthropist now and then, because I do not socialize with many people. But it’s only my mind that avoids you, my heart is still with you, and seeks the distance so that it can keep on loving you.

Franz Grillparzer